Theatre Review: Sinners 

This week I enjoyed a trip to the theatre to see Sinners, which was written by the superbly talented Marie Jones and produced and staged by the Lyric Theatre. 

The play tells the story of an isolated farming community that comes under the spell of the charming yet mysterious preacher, Pastor O’Hare. Whilst his unorthodox style of preaching has won over the locals, not everyone is sold. Her husband has declared his devotion to the new ministry, but Tania Simpson is not convinced; with the help of her family and friends she is on a mission to find out what the Pastor’s true motivations are.

The first half of the production was very much about setting the foundations of the story, whilst the second ramped up the drama and the comedy and when it finished I had an ache in my side and a smile firmly on my face. With a sharp script, clever staging and an accomplished cast, it definitely made a lasting impression. When it comes to plays at the Lyric, Michael Condron has become somewhat of a measuring stick for me as to whether to get tickets. I’ve seen him in a few productions now, such as The 39 Steps and Smiley, and he has always been a highlight, so with Condron cast as the charismatic Pastor O’Hare, myself, and my culture buddy Mark, were really looking forward to seeing what he brought to this production. Condron gave a mesmerising performance, making it seem completely plausible that he could cast a spell over and entire community. He also has an amazing ability for physical comedy and at times had me laughing without having to say a word. However, Condron wasn’t the only talent in the cast. Seáinín Brennan as Tania was fantastic at playing a woman who will go to any lengths to protect her family. She was passionate and fierce and utterly compelling to watch. Louise Mathews as Coleen, Tania’s sidekick and best friend, honestly had me snorting with laughter. She is a natural performer who commanded your attention anytime she put a foot on stage. Charlie Bonner as Tania’s husband Stanley, was a revelation. He perfectly captured a vulnerability which made it very realistic as to why he would be willing to dismiss his family’s worries to offer up his worldly possessions in return for redemption. Alan McKee as Stanley’s brother Sydney provided lashings of comedy to the proceedings. As a culchie living in the city, I found something comfortingly familiar about his portrayal of a local farmer. He perfectly captured the hilarious colloquialism of local life and that seriously amused me. I also have to say the younger members of the cast: Adele Gribbon as Millie, Michael Johnston as Jed and Patrick McBrearty as Dino added an unbridled youthfulness to the show as well as each having impeccable comedic timing that added a new dimension to the play. 

Unfortunately Sinners closed its run last night but if it returns to the Lyric or you get the chance to see one of these wonderfully talented actors in another production, I suggest you get yourself a ticket booked. Right, I am away to get ready for a new show coming to the Lyric; The Ladykillers (which runs from 10 June – 8 July and is adapted from the classic comedy by Graham Lineman); I’ll maybe see you there! 

Posted: 4/6/2017

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